Is Your House on Fire?

A few weeks ago I was at my dog park and it was later at night, around 9pm. I’d had a long day and felt my pup deserved an off-leash romp, even if that meant going in the dark. I didn’t expect anyone to be there, but an older woman was there with her two rascals. We started talking and before long I learned that as a young adult she had been a nun. It made sense, actually, she definitely had the demeanor of someone that had listened a lot in her life. The kind of listening were the words don’t matter so much as the space between the words.

Before you know it, she was telling me a story of someone she knew that was getting a divorce. She said that it seemed clear that the marriage had been over many years before, but that her “house wasn’t on fire yet” but that recently it had gone down quickly, all the way to the ground.

This concept of a house needing to be on fire before someone is motivated to truly change really struck me.

In terms of health and wellness many people don’t change until their house is on fire. They wait until their cholesterol is so high that it requires medication. They wait until they can’t climb a flight of stairs without losing their breath. They wait until the 5 pounds of holiday season weight has become 20 the next July.

And this makes sense. Life is busy, complicated and sometimes just getting by feels like you are winning at life. Treading water is better than drowning. I heard that and I feel that, too.

But we all know that it doesn’t have to be this way. Is there an area of your life that feels like that? Are you barely keeping your head above? Let’s focus on that and let’s try to change before your ship is totally sunk. Let’s stop before your fire begins — it’s so much easier to re-decorate a house than it is to re-build it, right?

If your area is fitness and healthy eating and you are just keeping your head above water right now, let’s do these three things this week to ensure we catch you before your house is engulfed in flames:

1. Focus on ADDING in one healthy eating behavior. That could be eating one huge salad a day with a lean protein. That’s it. Don’t change anything else in your diet, just ADD this salad.

2. Add in a high-intensity-interval training session to your workout week. Don’t change anything else you’re doing workout-wise. Just ADD this in. This can be some sprint repeats, hill sprint repeats and anything Tabata-style, like intervals on a spin bike. Shoot for a 20-minute session. Yes, that’s it!

3.  Spend one hour a week doing a relaxing self-care focused thing for yourself. This could be a leisure walk, a yoga class or podcast, or meditation — you can break it up into 10 minutes 6 – 7 days a week, too. 

Commit to this House on Fire Challenge for one week and tell me how it goes! If you need ideas on some high-intensity workouts to try, just ask!

kettlbell

The Importance of Flexibility: Food Choices

There is a popular fitness meme that is often brought up in terms of nutrition:  “if you fail to plan, you plan to fail”, which I believe is drawn from a popular Benjamin Franklin quote:

I must have first heard this concept back in 2007 or 2008 at the beginning of my BootCamp career and I loved it. It resonated with me and made so much sense:  knowing in advance what you’ll eat is an amazing way to lose weight or to simply eat healthier. It takes the stress off of the everyday because you don’t think, you just pull out the food you prepped on Sunday and eat that. The weeks I planned my meals and prepped food in advance, I ate better, hands down. Keep it simple, right?

Of course maintaining that degree of meticulousness when it comes to food is a challenge for a lot of reasons that I won’t go into now. As such, I can only think of a few distinct periods of time over the last 7 years that I was able to do it religiously. They didn’t last long, but they yielded positive results in terms of weight loss, body fat reduction and general well-being. It works. It just isn’t very sustainable for the long-term.

Continue reading “The Importance of Flexibility: Food Choices”